Brisbane and Queensland have had one of the quietest cyclone seasons since satellite tracking was introduced in 1970, reports the Brisbane Times.

There has only been one cyclone to cross the coast, but there are patterns to suggest that there may be a higher frequency of cyclones next year.

Cyclone regularity below BOM averages

Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) climatologist, Blair Trewin, told the Brisbane Times that this year has been well below the long-term averages.

"What tends to happen in an El Nino year is that cyclone activity in the pacific gets pushed eastward, so you get fewer cyclones close to Queensland and you get more else further east, into the south-pacific, but this year has been a very quiet year, even by El Nino standards," said Trewin.

Always good to be prepared

Even though this year's cyclone season has saved many a house, shed and water tank from destruction, there is some risk according to BOM of a greater cyclone season next year.

To make sure you are prepared, BOM recommends some of the following:

  • Check your home is built to cyclone standards.
  • Check walls, roof and eaves are safely secured.
  • Have a full tank of gas in your car.
  • Prepare an emergency kit.
  • Check on your neighbours and ensure that they know the situation.
  • Remove dangerous items that could blow around and harm you during a cyclone.

Background on cyclones

BOM currently has its cyclone status for all regions set at "very low", stating that with years that are going through an El Nino weather patterns, the date of first tropical cyclone to cross the coast is later than during neutral years. This date is usually the second week of January.

Typically the Australian cyclone season starts from November 1 to April 30, and there are an estimated eleven tropical cyclones every season. Even when they remain offshore, cyclones still impact coastal regions significantly.

By David Francis