California is currently going through a massive drought, lessened only slightly by the recent El Nino weather patterns. In terms of water reserves, as of April 11, 2016 Folsom Lake, Lake Shasta and Lake Oroville were the only large lakes above historical levels – that means nine out of 12 of the regions largest lake catchments are still well below historical averages.

California's officials are now looking outside of state, mainly to Australia, in order to remodel its strategies in order to make them more efficient.

Drought response

Felicia Marcus, chairwoman of the State Water Resources Control Board – which regulates California's water – spoke in an exclusive to the Guardian of the example Australia has set with its government's widespread and systematic response to drought, as well as the need for more water storage in a variety of ways.

"We rely a lot on Australia for our thinking. They have overtaken because of the depth of their crisis." Marcus said. "We are trying to catch up with them. I envy their model, I really do."

Rainwater tanks

It is true that Australians are smart about water conservation and rain water collection. The Australian Bureau of Statistics reported that at last count in 2013 over 2.3 million households within Australia owned and used a rainwater tank, and the numbers have bound to have grown since. Additionally, 34 per cent of Australians who were living in a dwelling where a rainwater tank would be suitable owned one.

The implications for water tank usage are huge and impact the individual as well as the nation, cutting down costs and reducing the risk of future losses through drought. To join the movement towards sustainable water usage, get in touch with us today to discuss your water storage options.

By Gerald Beckton